Oct 31, 2017
2 min read
 

Shifting the “Because”: Overcoming the Victim Mentality

In 2 Nephi 4, commonly referred to as “Nephi’s psalm,” there is an interesting pattern and reversal that centers around the word “because.” First, here is the list of things Nephi uses to justify his sorrows:

  1. my heart sorroweth because of my flesh;
  2. my soul grieveth because of mine iniquities.
  3. I am encompassed about, because of the temptations and the sins
  4. my heart groaneth because of my sins

Nephi appears to be placing the blame on external influences for how he feels. He sees himself as a victim of these influences and in so doing, allows them to have power over him. Then we see a change in focus as he begins to question his own perspective. Nephi then begins to recall all of the amazing things that God has done for him in his life. This new focus prompts several “why should” questions in regards to those “because of” justifications.

  1. why should my heart weep and my soul linger in the valley of sorrow, and my flesh waste away, and my strength slacken, because of mine afflictions?
  2. why should I yield to sin, because of my flesh?
  3. Yea, why should I give way to temptations, that the evil one have place in my heart to destroy my peace and afflict my soul?
  4. Why am I angry because of mine enemy?

Nephi isn’t getting an answer to prayer here, he isn’t doing anything spectacular, he is simply thinking. He is revolving these issues in his mind and weighing them. In this process, he finds the power to shift his perspective and reorient his trajectory. Fortified with a renewed resolve, Nephi drops some firm covenantal “do nots” in opposition to those “because of” justifications.

  1. Do not anger again because of mine enemies.
  2. Do not slacken my strength because of mine afflictions.

Then, the final “because” comes into play:

“May the gates of hell be shut continually before me, because that my heart is broken and my spirit is contrite!” (vs.32)

Nephi concludes that when you trust the arm of flesh, whether it is your own or that of others, you will experience failure and even tragedy. Nephi doesn’t mince words and straight up calls it a curse when you put your trust in fallible beings. Nephi realizes that even though he fails himself by giving in to sin, and others fail him by becoming his enemy, God has never failed him and never will.

“O Lord, I have trusted in thee, and I will trust in thee forever. I will not put my trust in the arm of flesh; for I know that cursed is he that putteth his trust in the arm of flesh. Yea, cursed is he that putteth his trust in man or maketh flesh his arm.” (vs.34)

Through this, Nephi escapes his mental prison of victimhood and realizes the power that comes from faith in God. He will still sin, and he may never make peace with his enemies but God will always walk beside him. One will never find true peace in this world, not really, not lasting and fulfilling peace. When we put our trust in God and allow him to prove himself to us, we will find that peace that we seek.

2 Comments

  1. Very thoughtful article. All of us , even Nephi, suffer the trials and conditions of mortality. Nephi’s lament teaches us how to use the doctrines we have been taught to exercise faith in God in order to receive the help and strength we need to overcome the trials, troubles and injustices we experience as fallen mortals.

    • Thanks for your comments. We have so many answers but run low on faith, it is as if we have storehouses of grain but lack the willingness, patience, or desire to sow and harvest. Thus, we are left to ourselves and many suffer while getting distracted and hung up on meaningless things that will never bear fruit. Victimhood is promoted as a virtue, and coveted as a strength because it is much easier to blame another rather that take responsibility.

      Satan is called “the accuser of our brethren” Rev 12:10. It is popular to make accusations today. Some are well-founded, there are legitimate victims and offenders, but then there are so very many that find a deficit in their own lives and spend more time looking for someone or something else to blame rather than realizing that they are perfectly capable to rising into the light with the help of God.

Join the Conversation: